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Is online ordering another hand in your pocket? It doesn’t have to be.


Ever feel like too many people have their hands in your pockets?


You’re not alone. Thousands of pizzerias are literally giving their profits away to third-party online and mobile ordering sites. Although applications such as GrubHub and Eat24 are popular with customers, many restaurants aren’t faring as well, thanks to high commissions, hidden costs and cross-promotion to their customers.

“We’re hearing from a number of pizza shop owners who are really frustrated with the high commissions they have to pay on each sale,” said Ron Resnick, president and CEO of OrderSnapp, Inc. “They’re even finding that some of their loyal customers are beginning to order through these sites versus dealing directly with their business, which cannibalizes sales.”

Commission-Free Ordering


One option perfectly suited for pizzerias is OrderSnapp—a commission-free, all-in-one digital ordering system that helps pizzerias increase profits while providing the ease and convenience of online and mobile ordering to customers.

The OrderSnapp team helps restaurants establish or improve their online presence by offering their own ordering site—or link off of their existing site—so customers can easily order on any device (smartphone, tablet, or monitor). OrderSnapp also gives restaurants their own customized mobile application in the Apple and Android app stores.

Take Back Your Customers Today


OrderSnapp will develop a strategic plan to convert your customers to use your online ordering site and not high-commission sites. That’s what the team did with Palermo Pizzeria in upstate New York. Owner Anthony (Tony) Randazzo estimates OrderSnapp technology has saved the business over $10,000 in third-party commission payments over the last 12 months. “Since restaurant owners already deal with very tight margins, OrderSnapp helps them connect directly with customers so they can maximize online orders,” Resnick said. “We don’t charge commission on any orders. What we do is provide restaurants with a service so they can grow their own business.”

Simplify and Save


With OrderSnapp’s all-in-one service, pizzeria owners have one place where they can manage all their digital assets—website, online ordering, social media, domain names, customer relations, coupons, and e-mail campaigns. They can promote their own domain name and have access to all of the customer data that is collected. The team also provides social media support, search engine optimization, couponing, print marketing, reputation management and 24-hour customer service.
For more info, call 888-402-6863 or visit ordersnapp.com.



For Immediate Release

OrderSnapp Announces New Free Tablet Point-of-Sale System for Restaurants and Pizzerias
From marketing and reputation management to order capture and sales, OrderSnapp now provides a one-stop-shop for small business owners to manage its digital assets online

Rochester, N.Y., June 22, 2015—Attention all restaurant entrepreneurs. OrderSnapp, a leading provider of online and mobile ordering technologies for small restaurants and pizzerias, is now offering a free tablet point-of-sale (POS) system. Both startups looking to control investment costs and current restaurant owners who want to avoid expensive upgrades on old POS systems can rely on OrderSnapp POS to help them manage their businesses and start selling today. 
Over the past two years there has been a significant move in the restaurant market to replace existing larger, pricier POS systems with iPads and other tablet devices. The shift in POS is being driven by the need for restaurants to accept new mobile payment options, as well as prepping for EMV, and better integration with e-commerce and operational systems.  
"Static POS systems no longer meet the needs of today's restaurants," said Ronald Resnick, president and CEO, OrderSnapp. "From day one, restaurants need to be able to provide flexibility in the way they take orders and process payments. They also need instant access to analytics reports to help them make intelligent business decisions so they can stay in business and succeed."
The OrderSnapp POS system has features of a high-end POS without the price. It provides easy menu or catalog editing, split checks and payment, shift/cashbox management, and kitchen and receipt printing. It allows restaurant owners to track sales and cash flow, and can help simplify bookkeeping by acting as a cash register and payment terminal. The OrderSnapp POS system also makes communications between the kitchen and servers more direct, and provides fast transactions through secure, credit card processing for in-store, take-out, and delivery orders.
"OrderSnapp POS system can be run from an iPad and provides an easy to use interface and dashboard," said Resnick. "Technology and security upgrades are done automatically, putting no extra charge or burden on the business owner for upkeep or maintenance."
Running a Business with OrderSnapp POS Hardware Kit
With OrderSnapp POS, there is no set up fee, the software is completely free, and it can be used with standard hardware. Should businesses require hardware, OrderSnapp also offers an optional set up kit starting at $650 that comes with a 30-day money back guarantee. The package includes some of the most popular, dependable, and low cost hardware to run a business, including:
•    TSP143 (LAN) Ethernet Thermal Kitchen and Receipt Printer
•    APG Vasario 1616 Black 16x16 (5) Bill (5) Coin
•    iDynamo5 (Lightning): Encrypted and secure credit card payments with simple fees and quick deposits
•     Enclosure & Brackets: Fits all full size iPads (available in 3 colors)
•    APG Star Cable
Integrating with OrderSnapp All-in-One Digital Ordering System
The OrderSnapp POS system integrates with the company's all-in-one digital ordering system designed to help restaurants, pizzerias, and small chains increase profits while providing the ease and convenience of online and mobile ordering to customers. Through the all-in-one system, OrderSnapp is also able to provide online marketing, business listing management, social media, and couponing support.
"Many small business owners do not have time to effectively manage their digital assets and online presence," said Resnick. "Trying to manage SEO, Google, Yahoo, Bing, and Yelp can be overwhelming--paralyzing even--but it's extremely important because if not properly executed, it will have a negative impact on reputation and profits."
OrderSnapp helps restaurateurs and business owners build their own custom website and branded mobile app. People can promote their own URL without having to go through third-party sites. OrderSnapp does not charge commission on any orders, including cash orders. And there is no cross-promotion involved. Plus, people can access all of the customer contact data that is collected, including customer name and email addresses.  This can be used for greater customer relationship management overtime or used immediately to generate and communicate a promotion on a slow night.
"Restaurant owners should be focusing on making great food," said Resnick. "We can help do the rest!"

For more information about OrderSnapp, call 888.402.6863 or visit www.ordersnapp.com.

About OrderSnapp
OrderSnapp provides a suite of products to help restaurants and pizzerias manage their entire business. The company is a leading innovator in pre-developed mobile business solutions. Its in-house software developers and technical staff build POS systems, mobile applications and websites for small businesses to better compete in their geographic areas and industries with solutions that can be implemented and maintained at affordable monthly costs. With OrderSnapp online and mobile ordering and POS systems, restaurants, pizzerias, small chains, and startups can start selling today. The company was established in 2003 and is located in Rochester, NY. To learn more about OrderSnapp, visit www.ordersnapp.com
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Fast Casual, OrderSnapp launches free POS for pizzerias, small restaurants

 June 22, 2015

Fast Casual
OrderSnapp, provider of online and mobile ordering technologies for small restaurants and pizzerias, is now offering a free tablet point-of-sale system, the company announced in a press release. The tablet is designed for startups looking to control investment costs and current restaurant owners who want to avoid expensive upgrades on old POS systems.

Mobile payments and EMV prep are driving the shift in POS for better integration with e-commerce and operational systems, the company said.

"Static POS systems no longer meet the needs of today's restaurants," Ronald Resnick, president and CEO, OrderSnapp, said in a statement. "From day one, restaurants need to be able to provide flexibility in the way they take orders and process payments. They also need instant access to analytics reports to help them make intelligent business decisions so they can stay in business and succeed."

The OrderSnapp POS system provides menu or catalog editing, split checks and payment, shift/cashbox management and kitchen and receipt printing. It allows restaurant owners to track sales and cash flow and provides bookkeeping by acting as a cash register and payment terminal. The OrderSnapp POS system also enables communications between the kitchen and servers with transactions through secure, credit card processing for in-store, take-out and delivery orders.

"OrderSnapp POS system can be run from an iPad and provides an easy to use interface and dashboard," said Resnick. "Technology and security upgrades are done automatically, putting no extra charge or burden on the business owner for upkeep or maintenance."

fastcasual.com


Is GrubHub Eating Into Your Profits?


We get it. GrubHub called your restaurant and offered to become a partner with you. They said they’d include you in their restaurant database and promote your business to their millions of users. They also probably said they’d do this all for free.


We speak to small restaurant and pizzeria owners every day. Many have tried GrubHub. They understand, as we do, that the last thing GrubHub is, is free. In fact, GrubHub takes a commission between 10 and 15 percent (or more) on all orders. This is significant given the tight margins most restaurants operate under.
Plus, a restaurant’s exposure on GrubHub is dependent upon the level of commission it’s paying. The service is not loyal. Just because your restaurant was recommended to a person today, it may not show up for them again in their searches if other nearby restaurants are paying more in commission.   
Certainly, if you’re looking to attract new customers and your budget can sustain it, GrubHub could be useful. However more and more, we’re hearing that existing customers are ordering through GrubHub out of convenience. These are customers that previously would have just ordered directly from the restaurant, so sales are being cannibalized.


OrderSnapp provides a way for customers to directly order from your restaurant online or through a customized mobile app. It is available for a low monthly fee, which allows business owners to predict costs and budget accordingly. For a demonstration of OrderSnapp, please call (888) 402-6863.

FAST COMPANY Why Fax Won't Die


As long as some continue to insist on faxes, companies keep working to make sending a fax feel like you're not sending a fax at all.
By Steven Melendez


When OrderSnapp, a company that helps restaurants take orders online, works with its clients, it lets them choose how they want to be notified about incoming orders. Some prefer email, and some would rather get push notifications through their phones, says company president Ron Resnick. But a substantial number of OrderSnapp’s clients—somewhere between 30 and 40 percent, Resnick estimates—prefer to have their customers’ web and app orders delivered through a technology that has been rumored to be extinct: the fax machine.


"A lot of the smaller, family-owned or individually owned restaurants, there’s a lot of them that still don’t have Internet access," says Resnick. "They’re not very Internet savvy, or they don’t have an iPad or a mobile device in the store that they can receive the orders on."
"We’ll work with companies from Y Combinator—it’s not a matter of crusty companies that are trying to use fax."

Like many businesses in older industries, from law firms to medical labs, fax machines aren't seen as some ‘80s anachronism but as an efficient, reliable, and mostly secure way to communicate—the same way their own customers see their laptops and smartphones.

"Faxing has been there for so long, and they’re so used to it," says Resnick. "It doesn’t cost them anything extra. It’s still a very good success rate with it, as far as them going through."

To bridge the gap between the two eras of messaging technology, OrderSnapp, based in Rochester, N.Y., uses a service called Phaxio. Calling itself "faxing for developers," it’s one of several cloud-based faxing providers whose APIs make it possible to send and receive faxes without ever worrying about loading paper and toner into a traditional fax machine.



"It’s something that we work very hard to keep almost [invisible] for our clients," says Phaxio cofounder Howard Avner. That is, Phaxio lets its customers build faxing into their apps and websites with the same kind of APIs they'd use to integrate 21st-century services like posting tweets or sending email confirmations, without needing to think about the phone lines and screeching modems that make it all happen.
Josh Nankin and Howard Avner, the founders of Phaxio

Some of Phaxio’s customers are established companies looking to phase out their physical fax machines, and some are startups like OrderSnapp looking to work with clients in fax-dominated industries, says Avner. Either way, Phaxio's customers don't want to worry about the gory details of busy signals, line noise, and quirky old fax machines so they can focus on their core businesses. The company advertises simple pricing—7 cents per minute for faxing to and from the U.S. and Canada, 10 cents for other countries—and volume discounts for users with more than 50,000 faxes sent and received per day.

"We’ll work with companies from Y Combinator—it’s not a matter of crusty companies that are trying to use fax," Avner says, citing startups building apps for industries from health care to trucking. "We sit in the background and solve a really complicated problem for them."

Phaxio's one of several companies bridging the gap between the modern Internet and the legacy web of fax. Y Combinator-backed HelloFax is like the HelloSign virtual signature service it begat, but it also offers the ability to send and receive faxes through the web, via email or from cloud services like Dropbox and Google Drive. Another service, Free Fax, lets users use a webform to upload and fax a limited number of documents per day, sent for free with a Free Fax cover sheet; customers can also pay to send more faxes and remove that Free Fax logo.

"Relying on external services and software to abstract away the quirks of an underlying technology certainly isn’t unique to fax."

And EC Data Systems' service Faxage, which lets users send and receive faxes by email, through its website or using its API, says it processes more than 11 million minutes of fax transmissions every month. Faxage measures and bills usage in minutes to make price comparisons with traditional phone plans simpler, says EC Data Systems' president Christian Watts.

Relying on external services and software to abstract away the quirks of an underlying technology certainly isn’t unique to fax: Developers routinely use libraries like jQuery to handle the details of browser intercompatibility or tools like PhoneGap to build cross-platform mobile applications. OrderSnapp uses Amazon Web Services to send mobile push notifications and uses the cloud-based voice service Twilio to place automated calls to verify orders, so it’s natural the company would also work with a cloud-based fax provider as long as its customers keep wanting to receive faxes.
The sound of a fax, from "What Sound Looks Like," by Khara Cloutier, 2013.

Skeptics have argued for years that fax has already long overstayed its welcome—that its continued prevalence is just the result of typical enterprise conservatism and older generations' enthusiasm for the printed word and signatures inked on the proverbial dotted line.

But those in the digital fax industry point out that even businesses that have largely migrated records away from paper and aren't otherwise tech-averse still find value in fax. Companies don’t just keep sending and receiving all those faxes out of pure inertia, says Faxage's Watts.
A sense of privacy and security

Faxage's clients include high-tech medical testing companies that need to send confidential results to doctors’ offices, and law firms and other businesses that need a secure and legally vetted way to transmit documents to clients and colleagues. Besides medicine, mortgage banking, insurance agencies, and other highly regulated industries rely on faxes because faxed contracts are generally considered to be as legally binding as a signed-in-person version.
"Email is not considered to be a secure medium, but fax is, in terms of sending people’s medical information around."

Physicians' internal records may have moved away from paper, but there’s no online data transfer platform anywhere near as widely deployed as fax that offers the same privacy and reliability, Watts says. So companies looking to ditch their paper fax machines switch to cloud-based fax providers, where they can securely upload and download documents and know that the rest of the transmission goes through the medium they’ve trusted for decades.

"Medical is huge, and that’s because email is not considered to be a secure medium, but fax is, in terms of sending people’s medical information around. So that’s a really really large growth area, especially with the push towards electronic medical records, and folks wanting to have it in that format," Watts says.

Faxage and other services including Phaxio advertise HIPAA-compliant faxes for those dealing with medical data, letting users upload and download faxed documents through SSL-enabled web connections or encrypted emails.
What the modern fax experience looks like on Phaxio.

To some, faxes might seem safer than digital communications. Phone lines are vulnerable to surveillance, but cyber-threats tend to draw more attention and thus seem more likely. After the hack at Sony, employees reportedly resorted to using phone calls and fax machines again in order to avoid hackers.

Companies know encrypted and verified email services and other secure document transfer systems exist, but they also know that many of the companies they do business with won’t have the necessary software installed, says Watts.

A medical lab, for instance, can't insist doctors' offices install any particular data-transfer software, but it can reliably assume they have fax machines. Or a law firm needs a way to send someone a signed copy of a contract, and while it could potentially use some sort of digital signature, decades of legal precedent have made it clear that a faxed copy is every bit as good as a mailed document.
"In a lot of areas, the trade-off of it not being quite as fast or quite as sexy is easily paid for by the fact that it’s well understood and it’s glitch-free."

At restaurants that deliver to businesses—even restaurants that now use apps like Seamless—customers continue to fax in their orders. For restaurant employees used to snatching printouts from a fax machine, there's little desire to do away with a trusted technology in their kitchen workflow.

"It’s the fact that the underlying business process, whatever it is, is fax-based," says Watts. "And in order for that underlying business practice to change, all the participants in that underlying process would have to agree that they want to change."

Faxes also remain an essential tool for requesting documents from many government agencies. MuckRock, a journalism startup that files and publishes FOIA requests, sends an average of about a dozen faxes a day using an email-to-fax service called Faxaway. (This works provided that government agencies have working fax machines.) "Within the last five years, the only way I’ve used a fax is through this email-to-fax application, which is the most poetic thing imaginable," MuckRock projects editor Shawn Musgrave told Motherboard. "It’s bridging the generations of technology until the fax just finally goes away."

Fax is a little like Microsoft Office, Watts says, in that now that it’s so universally deployed, it’s hard for any competitor to steal too much market share without convincing an entire industry to shift gears.

"In some ways, it’s a good thing, because promoting standards means people know what to expect," he says. "In a lot of areas, the trade-off of it not being quite as fast or quite as sexy is easily paid for by the fact that it’s well understood and it’s glitch free."

[Fax Machine: Herjua via Shutterstock]

Online pizza ordering grows toward 50 percent of market

Digital pizza requests makes up 45 percent of Domino’s American sales
By Michelle Basch

 
photo
Online ordering for pizza is not just a wave of the future -- it's a tsunami crashing around the country.
WTOP.com reports that online ordering now makes up 45 percent of Domino’s Pizza’s sales in America. A Domino’s spokesman tells QSR Magazine that the company upgraded its mobile app late last year. The app now lets you order by talking to a computer voice named Dom, much like the iPhone’s Siri.
Pizza Hut, which in 1994 became one of the first companies to sell anything on the Internet, had its biggest digital sales day ever on Super Bowl Sunday this year. CNBC reports Pizza Hut racked up more than $10 million in digital sales by halftime. There’s no word on how big that number was at the end of the day.

OrderSnapp experiencing 40 percent Monthly Growth



Cumulus Computing LLC has experienced roughly 40 percent growth each month since the launch of OrderSnapp—a Web and mobile online ordering application—in 2012.


Read complete article from the Rochester Business Journal

http://www.rbj.net/article.asp?aID=210552


Online ordering provides the holy grail of customer-level data

 

Sept. 19, 2014 | by Noah Glass


My high school chemistry class taught me the difference between a "by-product" and a "co-product." Both are secondary and derived alongside the main product, but the co-product has unique inherent value, whereas the by-product may not. Tech experts have added to my Chemistry 101 education, recognizing that co-products also can be sold or reused profitably.
Restaurant industry analysts have asked me to explain the recent surge in popularity of digital ordering among quick-service restaurant and casual dining restaurant operators alike. In doing so, I've thought a lot about the co-products of my own product, digital ordering for restaurants. It turns out the co-product of digital ordering is also restaurant operators’ holy grail: customer-level data. The primary product adds great value to a brand – customers receive orders faster and feel like VIPs when they skip the line, and automated order taking and tender allow for greater transaction capacity. But the digital ordering process also unlocks a deep understanding of brands’ best customers and unearths marketing insights that yield game-changing results.
One such co-product is being able to visualize hungry customers' physical locations when they're thinking about your brand and your food. No, this doesn't require Minority Report-like "pre-cogs." These insights are derived from digital ordering searches. Ordering is compiled in the cloud, and our company creates a heatmap that shows where customers are when they initiate the digital search for a specific restaurant or food item. National restaurants can benefit from a city-by-city search, while local operators can get data down to the street level.
When compared against your current store locations, a geographic overlay of brand demand would give the development team incredible clues as to where to locate your next store, based on the key metric of digital demand. Now, what if you could layer in additional metrics, like which devices these would-be customers were using for their search and how usage compares to that of your loyal customers? For instance, you may realize that users of the latest Android device represent a meaningful audience profile for your brand. In that case, you might seek out digital order search hotspots that originate from the same kinds of devices.
Digital ordering represents a growing percentage of sales when an ordering platform is in place. Even for brands in which digital ordering represents a small percentage of total sales, digital ordering search traffic and order traffic represents a meaningful sample size from which brands can glean valuable insights about their best customers.
Digital ordering data is just one customer data stream in this growing field of big and little data. Companies like Beanstalk Data and Zipscene are changing the way organizations individualize data and communicate offers. Thanks to their work, the thick Sunday circular full of printed coupons may not be recognizable to coming generations. Customer profiles gleaned from a wide range of data are getting smarter. They provide insight into both on- and off-premise behaviors, including past orders, daypart habits, and guest survey responses. Nimble innovators like Food Genius are mining over 50 million menu items to help brands better define their item pricing strategy – and sharing some fun insights about how we eat, state by state, in the process.
Moreover, it’s not just the operator that benefits from insights into individual customer behavior. The customer gains the potential for new experiences and money-saving offers. Knowing that Mary only picks up lattes after 4 p.m. in the middle of the week, never orders from the breakfast menu, and has opted into text updates is a powerful insight – and could be a boon for Mary when she is offered a free coupon to try coffee cake with her latte every Wednesday in October.
By understanding more about who our customers are, where they are, which devices they use, and more, brands can better serve these customers and find more potential customers who share the same characteristics. That's the holy grail for success in a food service landscape that is increasingly competitive.

Photo provided by EmpireOnline.



Why should a pizzeria launch a smart phone mobile app?

 

September 2014   ➤
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Pizza Today
30 Years of Providing Business Solutions & Opportunities for Today's Pizzeria Operators
Why should a pizzeria launch a smart phone mobile app?
 By: Daniel P. Smith
 
In both distance and mindset, Grand Forks, North Dakota, is far from the dreamy-eyed, tech-charged ways of Silicon Valley.
This reality does not escape Tyler Kuenzel.
“There’s a lag in technology in North Dakota and it takes a while for something to move to adoption,” says Kuenzel, co-owner of Deek’s Pizza, an 18-year-old concept with locations in Grand Forks and Fargo. “Even so, that doesn’t deter us from trying to be ahead of the curve with technology.”
To wit, Deek’s unveiled a smartphone app in late 2011 convinced the tool would boost sales and brand loyalty. “It’s another way for us to get orders into the system. Plus, it’s a great marketing tool; people look down and they see our logo,” Kuenzel says.
According to global research firm Nielsen, about 50 percent of U.S. mobile subscribers own a smartphone and an accelerating number of those folks rely on the device for everything from banking and driving directions to entertainment, shopping and dining.
For pizzerias, apps can be a cost-effective tool to stand out in a crowded marketplace and jumpstart sales.
“Having an app signals you’re a player in the market and ready to compete,” says Laura Gaudin, product manager for Revention, a Houston-based company that develops mobile apps and other restaurant management solutions.
Compared to Web sites, apps are more efficient, streamlined and easier to navigate on a smartphone. The most effective restaurant apps include:
a full menu with tempting photos alongside pricing; routinely updated specials, something that can be automated through a shop’s POS; location information, including a map; loyalty program link-in and payment functionality.
“If you’re missing any of these elements, you really need to ask yourself if you’re giving something of value to your customers,” Gaudin says. “You want to keep them with you rather than sending them to other sites, such as Yelp or GrubHub, where they’ll encounter different choices.”
Apps provide the customer greater control, result in more accurate fulfillment as orders typically travel from the smartphone directly to the kitchen, and, some data suggests, encourage higher tickets since the customer sees images of the food, has time to review the menu and pays with plastic rather than out-of-pocket cash.
Such benefits led Shawn Randazzo to launch a mobile app for the Detroit Style Pizza Company in mid-2012.
“We’re not answering phones, but making pizzas, and our customers can explore the menu and browse every category. No one’s feeling rushed,” says Randazzo, the 2012 International Pizza Expo World Champion Pizza Maker who oversees three Detroit Style locations in metro Detroit.
Before starting the app-development process, Scott Hirsch, CEO of Appsbar, a free app-building tool, says operators must ask themselves if the app will meet the basic needs of the business. In the pizzeria world, apps are most appropriate for carryout and delivery spots where guests utilize advance ordering.
“At the end of the day, the app’s a business tool and it’s one that needs to make sense for your specific restaurant,” Hirsch reminds.
Many app developers charge a small fee to create the app (from $100 to well north of $10,000) and/or a monthly fee ranging from $10 to $100. Additional costs frequently apply to post the app on a distribution platform, such as the iPhone’s App Store or Android’s Google Play, while routine maintenance fees can heighten one’s investment.
Gaudin suggests operators ask app developers: What’s the all-in cost? “You need to know what this technology comes with. It’s easy to get hooked on price alone, but there’s more to it,” says Gaudin, adding that many restaurants employ the store’s online ordering provider to develop the app since there is significant carryover between the two services.
Hirsch, meanwhile, advises business owners to visit iTunes or Google Play to review a developer’s apps and ratings.
“Each business has it’s own intricacies, so you want any developer to understand your business, which is different than a dry cleaner or a car wash,” he says.
As online ordering continues gaining acceptance, apps are expected to gain significant traction, particularly since they can store payment information directly on the smartphone.
Currently, Randazzo’s three shops capture about 100 online orders each week, about 20 percent of those coming via the store’s app. He anticipates that number climbing and hopes online and app orders eventually represent 50 percent of company sales.
“Everyone has their phone in their hands these days, so those numbers are going to go up,” he says, adding that downloads of the Detroit Style Pizza app increased when the chain began touting the app on its homepage. “If we keep promoting it, we think it will keep growing.”
At Deek’s, Kuenzel believes app orders could follow the trajectory of the shop’s long-established online ordering platform, especially as Deek’s unleashes continued promotions to spur downloads. At first slow, Deek’s online orders graduated from a few each week to a few each day, soon notching month over month increases.
“Online’s progression gives us hope that apps will similarly take off,” Kuenzel says. “Our hope is that mobile app orders reach about 15 percent of our intake within the next two years.”
Operator-friendly apps
As intriguing as smartphone apps might be as a consumer friendly marketing tool, apps can also help operators run a more cost-efficient and profitable pizzeria. Notable apps include:


Chicago-based writer Daniel P. Smith has covered business issues and best practices for a variety of trade publications, newspapers, and magazines.


Generational demand drives adoption of mobile technology in restaurants

Remember when you only needed to worry about marketing to baby boomers and Generation X? Now, restaurants need to focus on the "smartphone generation."

According to Digitimes Research, global smartphone shipment reached a total of nearly 700 million in 2012, and is estimated to reach 1.6 billion in 2017. A driving force behind this trend, is the under 35 year-old crowd that use their smartphones for everything from social media to music and retail purchases to ordering takeout.


To answer this call, Gourmet Pizza and Subs, which is located in Pasadena, is now offering its customers online and mobile ordering through OrderSnapp.

Gourmet Pizza and Subs is a family-owned and operated restaurant. Bob and Lorraine Bartch opened it in 1988, after working in a steel mill and bank, respectively. Prior to implementing OrderSnapp, the restaurant had only a static website. However, with the industry trending more online and takeout representing 80 percent of its business, Bartch decided to make it easier for customers to do business with the restaurant by using their computers and mobile devices. Bartch says he is promoting Gourmet Pizza and Subs' online ordering capability through word-of-mouth at the restaurant, as well as on its Yelp account. To date, more than 100 customers have downloaded the restaurant's mobile application.

With so many people ordering takeout and delivery from their computers and smartphones, restaurants across the country are realizing the need to adopt online and mobile ordering technology. Once thought to be luxuries reserved for larger chains, online and mobile ordering is now a necessity for all restaurants offering takeout and/or delivery. For more information about OrderSnapp, call 888.425.9424 or visit www.ordersnapp.com.

Subject: Is GrubHub Eating Into Your Profits?

We get it. GrubHub called your restaurant and offered to become a partner with you. They said they’d include you in their restaurant database and promote your business to their millions of users. They also probably said they’d do this all for free. 


We speak to small restaurant and pizzeria owners every day. Many have tried GrubHub. They understand, as we do, that the last thing GrubHub is, is free. In fact, GrubHub takes a commission between 10 and 15 percent (or more) on all orders. This is significant given the tight margins most restaurants operate under.
Plus, a restaurant’s exposure on GrubHub is dependent upon the level of commission it’s paying. The service is not loyal. Just because your restaurant was recommended to a person today, it may not show up for them again in their searches if other nearby restaurants are paying more in commission.    
Certainly, if you’re looking to attract new customers and your budget can sustain it, GrubHub could be useful. However more and more, we’re hearing that existing customers are ordering through GrubHub out of convenience. These are customers that previously would have just ordered directly from the restaurant, so sales are being cannibalized. 


OrderSnapp provides a way for customers to directly order from your restaurant online or through a customized mobile app. It is available for a low monthly fee, which allows business owners to predict costs and budget accordingly. For a demonstration of OrderSnapp, please call (888) 402-6863.


Customer Testimonial: Romano's Pizzeria and Italian Restaurant




Like many independent and family-owned restaurants, Romano's Pizzeria and Italian Restaurant romanospizzeria.ordersnapp.com, which is located off Interstate 95 near the Philadelphia International Airport, is constantly evaluating technology to try and strengthen its presence on the web. As owner Pete Romano puts it, "Get the best ‘Googlejuice’ we can by being smart about how we spend our money on online marketing."  
Open for business for 70 years, they are well-known to locals as the originators of the Stromboli. In fact, it was Pete's grandfather Nazzereno "Nat" Romano who created a secret recipe for dough and invented the Stromboli sandwich in 1950.
Still, residential customers are a small percentage of Romano's business. Rather, a great deal of its takeout and delivery orders, which combined equal about 75 percent of its business, come from nearby hotels.
"Ideally, you want your restaurant or pizzeria to be in the center of a circle when it comes to delivery," said Romano. "But, we're challenged in that way because we're surrounded by highways and a river. We've had to adjust our business to not only serve our regulars, but also those traveling through the area and staying at nearby hotels."
The ability to capture orders online through OrderSnapp in an easy and straightforward way to help its customers acquire authentic Italian food. Amazing, homemade food, such as veal scaloppini, chicken Alfredo, red and white clam sauce, or pizzas created with dough that takes more than eight hours to process. With OrderSnapp, Romano's is able to keep 100 percent of their profits and not have to pay any high commissions or fees that can be associated with other online services.
Romano's Pizzeria and Italian Restaurant changed the face of pizzerias across the world when it created the Stromboli years ago, and now it's adapting its business again to operate in a way that both meets customers' demand and provides another source of revenue so that the restaurant and pizzeria can go on for generations to come.





Research predicts restaurant mobile and online revenue will triple within the next five years

Recent research predicts that restaurant mobile and online revenue will triple within the next five years. Is your independent or family-owned restaurant or pizzeria ready for this revenue opportunity?

Learn more about how OrderSnapp is helping restaurants across the country from our latest news release:

New OrderSnapp Web and Mobile Ordering System Helps Restaurants and Pizzerias Reach Customers Online
Western NY company challenges current online takeout and delivery model; provides commission-free ordering so restaurants increase profits without raising prices

Rochester, N.Y., July 11, 2014—Given the rising popularity of online and mobile ordering from restaurants, Cumulus Computing introduced OrderSnapp nationwide today. This all-in-one digital ordering system is designed to help restaurants, pizzerias, and small chains increase profits while providing the ease and convenience of online and mobile ordering to customers.
"Because more than 75 percent of people are now searching for restaurants using a mobile device, it's no longer a luxury to have online and mobile ordering—it's a necessity," said Ron Resnick, president, Cumulus Computing. "Unfortunately, the choices up until this point have either been very expensive or packed with hidden costs, and small businesses have paid the price."

OrderSnapp is perfectly suited for small restaurants and pizzerias. It is a pre-developed business solution, which means restaurants and pizzerias do not have to spend thousands of dollars building their own sites. Instead businesses can work with the OrderSnapp team to leverage its technology and create a customized online ordering website—or page off an existing site—and mobile application, all for a low monthly fee.

Using a technology called responsive design, restaurant websites are personalized with business name and logo, and work on any size device (e.g., phone, tablet, pc, etc.). The easy-to-use website allows customers to find a restaurant and its phone number, location, coupons and complete menu, and gives them the ability to place orders in a matter of seconds.

The industry for online and mobile takeout and delivery ordering is blowing up right now. Earlier this year, GrubHub went public with a valuation of more than $2 billion, while Eat24 is making strides on the West Coast. Although these applications are popular with consumers, many restaurants are not fairing as well.

"We're hearing from a number of small restaurants and pizza shop owners who are really frustrated with the high commissions they are required to pay on each GrubHub sale," said Resnick. "They're even finding that some of their loyal customers are beginning to order through these mobile apps versus dealing directly with the business, which is cannibalizing sales."

According to Resnick, other restaurants and pizzerias aren't comfortable with the cross-promoting of other nearby restaurants that can also happen on these sites. "It's given these small businesses a reason to rethink their online presence and marketing strategy," he said.

With OrderSnapp, the restaurateur or business owners can promote its own URL. Plus, they can access all of the customer contact data that is collected, including customer name and email addresses. OrderSnapp does not charge commission on any orders, including cash orders. And there is no cross-promotion involved. The site is theirs alone. Customers can even search and download the restaurant's app for free from the Apple iTunes store or Android's Google Play Market.

In addition to helping businesses establish or improve their online presence, the team at OrderSnapp also provides the restaurant with social media support and couponing. Restaurants and pizzerias can also expect to see improvements in local and organic search results.

The OrderSnapp mobile app ordering solution costs $49 per month and the all-in-one solution, including online ordering website, mobile app, and social media support costs $79 per month. There is also no set up fee or contract required.

For more information about OrderSnapp, call 888.425.9424 or visit www.ordersnapp.com.

About Cumulus Computing
Cumulus Computing is a leading innovator in pre-developed mobile business solutions. The company's in-house software developers and technical staff build mobile applications and websites for small businesses to better compete in their geographic areas and industries with solutions that can be implemented and maintained at affordable monthly costs. The company's latest solution, OrderSnapp, is an online and mobile ordering system that helps restaurants, pizzerias, and small chains reach customers online and increase profits. Cumulus Computing was established in 2003 and is located in Rochester, NY. To learn more about Cumulus Computing, visit www.cumuluscomputing.com.

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Welcome to our newsroom and blog!

Welcome to our newsroom and blog!

Because more than 75 percent of people are now searching for restaurants using a mobile device, it's no longer a luxury to have online and mobile ordering—it's a necessity. New research even predicts restaurant mobile and online revenue will triple within five years due to this increased use of smartphones.

Larger chains with IT budgets and people to manage and build these tools already have their online and mobile presence in place. Other restaurants are turning to companies such as GrubHub. However, many of our customers have expressed frustrations over the high commissions that are charged on all orders.

So, what if you're the small family restaurant, neighborhood joint, or beloved local pizzeria…what do you do?

In this section of our website, we’ll be sharing information that small restaurant, pizzeria, and chain owners can use to build their online business—by increasing sales, maximizing marketing dollars, converting customers to mobile ordering, and strengthening their overall presence on the Internet.

OrderSnapp, which was developed by Cumulus Computing in Rochester, N.Y., is perfectly suited for these small restaurants and pizzerias. It is a pre-developed business solution, which means businesses do not have to spend thousands of dollars building their own sites. Instead businesses can work with the OrderSnapp team to leverage its technology and create a customized online ordering website and mobile application, all for a low monthly fee.

Those who follow this blog regularly will find important news and trends about the restaurant and hospitality industries and tips and tricks on how to easily take advantage of technology for the good of your business.  Our primary bloggers are Cumulus Computing Co-founders Ron Resnick, who also serves as president, and Robert Trimaldi. They are speaking with restaurant owners every day—those just getting started and those that have been around for 70 years—and have a very good sense of the challenges these businesses face, as well as how they are trying to adjust.

We hope you will leave comments, ask questions, and share your thoughts on what’s working for your business and what you hope to improve. No comments will be removed unless they are disrespectful in nature or use offensive language.

If you need to contact us with questions or have ideas for a future post, you can reach us at (888) 402-6863.